6 Deadlift Variations Your Butt Will Thank You For

Staggered Stance Deadlift

Staggered Stance Deadlift

This deadlift has you standing with your feet staggered a bit. Why? Williams says this allows you to lift heavier than a single-leg deadlift, because you’re more stable, while still challenging one side at a time and giving you the chance to improve any imbalances you have.

  • Stand with feet hip-width apart with a weight by each foot.
  • Place one foot a foot-length in front of the other so your stance is staggered.
  • Hinge at your hips and bend your knees to lower your body.
  • Grab each weight with your arms straight.
  • Push your butt far back and keep your back flat. Your torso should be almost parallel to the floor.
  • Keeping your core tight, push through your heels to stand up straight. Keep the weights close to your shins as you pull up.
  • Pause at the top and squeeze your butt, then slowly lower the weight back to the floor.





Offset Load Deadlift

Offset Load Deadlift

For this deadlift, you have two weight options: Either hold a weight in one hand and no weight in the other, or use a lighter weight in one hand and a heavier one in the other. The point is to have a different amount of weight on both sides of your body. “This challenges your stability, because you have to work harder to keep the hips square and keep your back nice and flat,” Williams explains. Challenging your stability means challenging your core—those muscles have to engage and work to keep your torso from rotating.

  • Stand with feet hip-width apart with weight (or weights) by your feet.
  • Hinge at your hips and bend your knees to lower your body.
  • Grab the (or each) weight with your arms straight.
  • Push your butt far back and keep your back flat. Your torso should be almost parallel to the floor.
  • Keeping your core tight, push through your heels to stand up straight. Keep the weights close to your shins as you pull.
  • Pause at the top and squeeze your butt, then slowly lower the weight back to the floor.

Sliding Deadlift

Sliding Deadlift

By adding a glider under one foot, you’re challenging your stability and getting your body moving in a way it’s probably not used to, Williams says. This is a simple way to keep your body guessing and therefore help your muscles adapt and change as they learn to do the move correctly. Don’t have a glider? A paper plate or towel will work, too.

  • Stand with feet together, holding one weight in your left hand in front of your left thigh.
  • Place your right foot on a glider (or paper plate or towel).
  • While keeping a slight bend in both knees, slide your right leg back behind your body, hinge at the hips to bring your torso parallel to the floor, and lower the weight toward the floor.
  • Keep your back flat. At the bottom of the movement, your torso should be almost parallel to the floor, with the weight a few inches off the floor.
  • Keeping your core tight, push through your left heel to stand up straight. As you do, slide the right leg back toward the left heel, and slide the weight back up to start.
  • Pause at the top and squeeze your butt, then slowly lower the weight back to the floor.





Sumo Stance Deadlift

Sumo Stance Deadlift

“Standing wider than the normal hip-width distance helps take load off the lower back, so if that’s something you struggle with, this is a good option,” Williams says. The reason is because you can get closer to the ground by using your legs, so you avoid overarching your back as you lower. “Because everybody is built so differently, some variations may be easier for you based on how tall you are, how long arms are,” or other factors, she explains.

  • Stand with feet wider than shoulder-width apart, knees slightly bent, and toes angled out. (The more you turn your legs out, the more this move will work your inner thighs.) One weight should be right in the middle of your legs.
  • Hinge at your hips and bend your knees to lower your body.
  • Grab the weight with your arms straight.
  • Push your butt far back and keep your back flat. Your torso should be almost parallel to the floor.
  • Keeping your core tight, push through your heels to stand up straight. Keep the weight directly underneath your body as you pull.
  • Pause at the top and squeeze your butt, then slowly lower the weight back down to the floor.
  • Source : www.self.com




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